• Post category:Learn
  • Post comments:0 Comments
  • Post author:
  • Post published:12/05/2021
  • Post last modified:12/05/2021
What Parents Should Consider When Their Children Are Playing Football

While playing a game on the field, a young player’s mind is focused on the game and what strategy should be applied to win the game. However, at the same time, the player’s attention may be distracted by loud parents who shout out instructions on scoring a goal, kicking from the sideline, or how to win in general. Of course, parents do this solely out of good intentions concerning their child, but such behavior can harm the young athletes’ performance. 

Parents should know that this is just a game, and they will not lose any money or pride if the game goes wrong. If making money was the intention then, live soccer betting would be a good option for them. Nonetheless, certain things should be considered by the parents when their children are playing. Here are some tips that will help parents assist their kids on the field and develop their behavior positively and sportingly. 

1 – Stop Teaching Your Child to Play When He or She is Playing on the Field

A common problem in youth football is emotional parents who sit in the stands and try to tell the young athlete how to play. This is especially difficult for the child if the parent’s instructions go against the coach’s instructions. Try to imagine yourself in a room with people who are constantly shouting instructions at you and you will have a good sense of  how your child likely feels during the match.

Often, the parents scream louder and even more aggressively than the coach. The coach brings the instructions to the children from the position of a teacher. He wants to improve the level of the whole team. This is part of his job. On the other hand, parents shout instructions only to their child and want immediate results. This is different from what the coach requires.

2- Don’t Judge the Judge (Referee)

Judges works objectively based on what they sees. The parent will interpret the same situation in favor of the team for which the child is playing. If it’s a decision that harms the team’s results, then parents will automatically look at it subjectively. The problem arises when parents react aggressively to the judge’s decisions. The child sees this and thinks that it is customary to behave this way. Parents must remember that they are always role models for their children.

3 – Focus on the Good Points of the Game, Not the Score

Too often, parents worry about the numbers on the scoreboard, forgetting about the experience their child gets every minute of the game. And although this is a natural desire – to want a victory for your child’s team – you should look at the match more broadly without getting hung up on the score.

If the team did not win, think about what it takes to get out the next time and show a better result. Coaches in any sport take the position that defeat is part of the process. If your team always wins, then the team will not be able to respond to a loss adequately, and it will be hard for the child to experience setbacks that happen from time to time. Losing is a big step in developing a child as a football player, and as a person!

4 – Respond Correctly to the Parents of the Opposing Team

Adults should go to their child’s tournaments to enjoy their game and without any confrontation. Parents are representatives not only of the football school but also of their young athletes. Imagine that your child sees the way you are behaving. What would you think? Are you proud of your behavior? Would you allow your child to behave the same way?

5 – Don’t Cheat Yourself Before Playing

Go to the game and enjoy it. See what your child is doing on the field. This is their game, not yours. There is no need to tie your emotional state to what is happening in front of the podium. Take a look at your child. Does he or she like the field? Does he or she show leadership qualities? Is he or she comfortable with their teammates? Don’t worry about the rest. Take a broader view of things. There are more critical things in life. For example, your child.

Photo Credit

Image by Josh Dick from Pixabay


Guest Author Bio
Vineet Maheshwari

Vineet Maheshwari is a passionate blogger and relationship oriented digital marketing consultant with over 10 years of experience in SEO, PPC management, web analytics, domain investing, affiliate marketing and digital strategy. He has helped high tech brands connect with customers in an engaging manner, thereby ensuring that high quality leads are generated over time.

 

 

Recent Guest Author Articles:

  • Myths about Art Collecting: Debunked
  • 5 Tips to Overcome Your Biggest Financial Fears
  • Chronic Illness and Self-Esteem: How Your Health Impacts How You Feel About Yourself
  • Renegade in Power – Again?
  • How Yoga and Meditation Can Help Heal Addiction

Leave a Reply